Fuzzdandy Presents: Corporal Copycat’s Phoney Hearts Club Bands Volume 2

I used to run a twitter account called Beatlealikes where I would just track down anything Beatlesque with the help of me mate Pete from Bite it Deep & post a YouTube link on twitter. After a while I started to categorise those tracks into groups of which Beatles album they sounded most influenced by. So I started putting together compilations of Beatlesque albums. I decided to start with Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. I also felt it was time to make some follow ups to “Pepperisms from Around the Globe”.. a fantastic compilation of 60’s artists who sounded heavily influenced by Sgt. PepperPepperisms Volume 2 never materialised so I thought I’d make one for myself & anyone else who is interested.

The release of Sgt. Pepper’s in 1967 brought with it a new angle for other artists to approach recording. Pepper ripped the remaining pages from the recording rule book that were left after the release of Revolver. It opened up the same possibilities to all bands, whether established or confined to the garage. Bands previously obsessed with The Beatles would now need to up their game in the studio, cleaning up their sound & bringing their instruments right into the listeners faces, using extra compression dynamics & new miking techniques. They could incorporate classical instruments into their songs, they could go all vaudeville, go back or forward in time for inspiration, they could make songs for kids as well as intellectuals, use world instruments & make sound collages.. anything goes, and do all of these things on one album.

Weirdly, despite Pepper’s widespread influence, it isn’t actually that easy to find obscure 60’s songs or albums that mimic Sgt. Pepper. It’s far easier to find albums that took inspiration from it & used this new licence to explore artistically in their own unique way. I have tried my best here to match each song in order of the original album, but it wasn’t always possible, maybe because their actually isn’t a complete rip off of Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds out there, or there is one & I haven’t discovered it yet. What I have tried to do is find a mood or lyrical theme that matches each song on Pepper. Each track also had to sound Beatlesque, so either the forced Liverpudlian vocal, or the overall sound had to be to a certain Beatles standard. I’ve added extra sound effects from other 60’s artists also to fill in the gaps.

This is Volume two. Volume one is also available via this blog.

Corporal Copycat’s Phoney Hearts Club Bands: 60’s Sgt Pepper-esque Artists – Volume 1

I used to run a twitter account called Beatlealikes where I would just track down anything Beatlesque with the help of me mate Pete from Bite it Deep & post a YouTube link on twitter. After a while I started to categorise those tracks into groups of which Beatles album they sounded most influenced by. So I started putting together compilations of Beatlesque albums. I decided to start with Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. I also felt it was time to make a follow up to “Pepperisms from Around the Globe”.. a fantastic compilation of 60’s artists who sounded heavily influenced by Sgt. Pepper. Pepperisms Volume 2 never materialised so I thought I’d make one for myself & anyone else who is interested.

The release of Sgt. Pepper’s in 1967 brought with it a new angle for other artists to approach recording. Pepper ripped the remaining pages from the recording rule book that were left after the release of Revolver. It opened up the same possibilities to all bands, whether established or confined to the garage. Bands previously obsessed with The Beatles would now need to up their game in the studio, cleaning up their sound & bringing their instruments right into the listeners faces, using extra compression dynamics & new miking techniques. They could incorporate classical instruments into their songs, they could go all vaudeville, go back or forward in time for inspiration, they could make songs for kids as well as intellectuals, use world instruments & make sound collages.. anything goes, and do all of these things on one album.

Weirdly, despite Pepper’s widespread influence, it isn’t actually that easy to find obscure 60’s songs or albums that mimic Sgt. Pepper. It’s far easier to find albums that took inspiration from it & used this new licence to explore artistically in their own unique way. I have tried my best here to match each song in order of the original album, but it wasn’t always possible, maybe because their actually isn’t a complete rip off of Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds out there, or there is one & I haven’t discovered it yet. What I have tried to do is find a mood or lyrical theme that matches each song on Pepper. Each track also had to sound Beatlesque, so either the forced Liverpudlian vocal, or the overall sound had to be to a certain Beatles standard. I’ve added extra sound effects from other 60’s artists also to fill in the gaps.

This is Volume 1, Volume 2 is on the way. Cheers.

  1.  Tune Up – Faine Jade (Sgt. Pepper’s Intro) 1968
  2.  Lady Riga – Amen Corner (Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band) 1969
  3.  Helping You Out – The Colours (With a Little Help from My Friends) 1968
  4. Captain Nemo – The Sundowners (Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds)
  5. Follow My Footsteps – The News (Getting Better) 1968
  6.  Lady in Lace – The Stained Glass (Fixing a Hole) 1968
  7. The Lady Who Said She Could Fly – The Idle Race (She’s Leaving Home) 1968
  8.  Opus#1 – The American Revolution (Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!) 1968
  9. Which Dreamed it – Boeing Duveen (Within You Without You) 1968
  10. Old Time Mover – John Bromley (When I’m Sixty-Four) 1969
  11. Soda Pop Man – The Back Alley (Lovely Rita) 1968
  12. Take Action – the Twilights (Good Morning Good Morning) 1968
  13. Bessy Goodheart – The Aerovons (Animal Sound FX) 1969 
  14. The MACB Theme – The Mystic Astrologic Crystal Band (Sgt. Pepper’s Reprise) 1968
  15. Just Because I’ve Fallen Down – The Buckinghams (A Day in the Life) 1968
  16. The Biggest Night of Her Life – The Nashville Teens (A Day in the Life Part II) 1967
  17. I’m Here – Thomas Edisun’s Electric Light Bulb Band (Inner Groove) 1968

https://www.mixcloud.com/fuzzdandy/fuzzdandy-presents-corporal-copycats-phoney-hearts-club-bands/

Oasis – The Masterplan (The Intended Third Album. An Alt Be Here Now)

In 1997 Oasis fans & the media were eagerly awaiting the release of the bands third album. A building sense of anticipation & mystique preceded it’s release, the likes of which hasn’t been experienced since maybe The Beatles left the world hanging before releasing their 1967 Sgt Pepper LP. Radio stations were denied pre release material, the press were forced to sign gag orders, preventing them from revealing anything which might ruin the surprise or dampen the hype. We were teased with song titles & the odd rumble of gossip, but were afforded no audio or solid information surrounding the forthcoming album. This all served to build up immense intrigue & a buzz around the release, it also meant that this next album had better be their very own Sgt Pepper, something special. The album was “Be Here Now” & at one point it was on course to be something very special indeed.

The problems with this third album actually began two years prior, in 1995 during sessions for the bands second album “(Whats the Story) Morning Glory”. That album, like “Be here Now” was a much anticipated release. Morning Glory was the follow up to their debut & instant classic album Definitely Maybe. So while the band worked excitedly on Morning Glory, Noel, unbeknownst to the rest of the band & record label, was actually working on & writing Oasis’ third album at home. He had even began jotting down an intended track-list & running order. One of the tracks on that list was Acquiesce & Noel chose to play that song to the band & Alan McGhee, the head of the bands label Creation Records. It was an instant hit with all of them & McGhee suggested releasing the song as a non-album single, much like they had done in 1994 with the single “Whatever”. Noel was unsure & pushed to release another new song, Some Might Say. He had an inkling that this song would appeal more to the masses & make more of a dent in the UK singles chart, Noel got his way (and was eventually proven right as it gained Oasis their first UK number 1 Single). It was then agreed that Acquiesce must be saved for the next album & later single release.

So far, so good. The bands 2nd album Morning Glory was coming together in the studio nicely, another classic album in the making, and judging by what they had heard of the ideas for a 3rd album, Oasis had another potential classic album to make after that. But this potential ‘classic third album’ soon became the inevitable ‘difficult third album’. Noel was tasked by McGhee to write & record a bside for the Some Might Say single asap. Noel ended up up leaving it till the last minute & with no spare material to put forward, told McGhee during a tipsy, late night phone call “fuck it man! just use Acquiesce. By the time the next album comes out I’ll have written somat else that’ll shit all over it”.

With Acquiesce being relegated to B-Side status, Noel knew that he needed something just as strong to replace it. The song that fell from the ether was “The Masterplan”.  He knew instantly that he had another potential hit single & anthem in the bag. He went into the studio the next day to show the band his latest masterpiece. Liam sat as still as the Buddha, listening intently until the final A minor chord rang out & faded to silence. He sprung from his chair & demanded that they record it straight away for Morning Glory. Noel calmly packed his acoustic & note pad away; “No kid, I’m saving this one for the next fucker, this will be the title track of the next album”. The Masterplan was a favourite of Liam’s & he was desperate to take the lead vocal on the track. You can imagine the disappointment & fury then when he learned that Noel, unprepared, had again, decided to demote this song to the B-Side of the Wonderwall single.

So unfortunately, as we all now know Be Here Now didn’t turn out the way Noel or the rest of the band had originally intended. Band politics, in-fighting & drug abuse fractured the growing momentum they had enjoyed during & immediately following the recording of Morning Glory. Ideally, McGhee wanted the band in the studio working on the album that would have been called The Masterplan during October 1995 for a potential September 1996 release. But without his title track & having already given away Acquiesce, the project had already had it’s foundations severely weakened. Obviously Oasis did go on to release an album called The Masterplan but that was a collection of B-Sides & not the classic studio release it was supposed to be. Having seen the list of tracks Noel had planned for the album we have put the album together as best we can. The original tracks were:

  1. Acquiesce
  2. Do you Know what I Mean
  3. The Masterplan
  4. Fade In Out
  5. The Girl in the Dirty Shirt
  6.  Be Here Now
  7.  I Got the Fever
  8.  Don’t Go Away
  9.  Going Nowhere
  10.  Its Getting Better Man

Be Here Now marked the end of my keen interest in Oasis. I queued up before work on the day of release, got the cover stamped in the shop to prove I was one of the first to buy it. I was late for work that day & told my boss I had been to the Dr’s. He let me off until he came striding out of his office into the factory with the local paper in his hand, it had a picture of me on the front page at the front of the queue at Ainley’s Records. I spent that working day willing the clock on towards 5.00 to get home & hear the album that Noel promised would shit all over the last 2 albums. I remember then spending the next few weeks trying to understand it, pretending that I liked it when deep down I actually felt like I was missing something that everyone else was in on. I think it took 6 months for everyone to own up to feeling pretty much the same way, the honeymoon period was over, people were realising what a disappointment the album was & it was evident that it wouldn’t stand the test of time. No one could believe that Oasis were capable of making such a poor album. It had its moments but listening to the album today you can see, as Noel has said himself, that the album is just a wall of strumming guitars turned up to 11, muddy with no dynamics. There is a good album in there but you can hear the lack of inspiration in the arrangement, production & song writing. It needed more time, it needed revisiting & remixing before release. It needed Acquiesce, The Masterplan, time spent on the production & love for the project. It is a big thing, because Oasis were huge, they were the biggest band at that time. When I first heard the band Doves on the radio in 2000, I thought it was the new Oasis single, after finding out that it wasn’t I remember wishing that it was. Luckily Oasis’ first 2 albums were that good that most people still saw them as the biggest & best band in the world & if Be here Now did turn out as good or better than either of those 2 albums then Oasis would have exploded. They couldn’t have got any bigger surely, so actually, wanting an album to be different to the way it is isn’t the organic way & Oasis‘ path had to go the way it did. Its fun to pretend & we can fantasise. If Oasis had made Doves first album “Lost Souls” then I think I’d still be wearing an anorak & swaggering around town now.

The story of the album above is one of my fabrications. Its an alternative history of the album & the way it could have gone in a twisted past. It helps back up my remix of the album. Bit of fun innit. I’m sure there are plenty of people that love Be Here Now, so we’re obviously not saying that our mix has made it better, but to me it has made it much more palatable. We have shortened some of the songs & edited parts together to help it to flow nicely. We also decided to use the Noel Gallagher remix of “Do You Know What I Mean“. Noel revisited the album in 2016 with the aim of remixing the whole album, losing some of the noise & allowing the album to breathe a little. He got as far as track one & then decided against the idea. I still think he should continue with that project. Not as a “this is what it should have sounded like” thing, but as a separate reimagining of the album, basically because his rethink on “Do you know what I mean” works so well. For now though, try out our alternative to Be here Now… The Masterplan.

 

https://www.mixcloud.com/fuzzdandy/oasis-the-masterplan-the-intended-3rd-album-the-alternative-be-here-now/

 

 

Paul McCartney – Egypt Station 2018 Album Review ….

Well in Macca! Egypt Station is a proper McCartney album, and in my opinion as solid as his 2005 album Chaos and Creation in the Backyard. Paul sounds full of fun & energy, the voice is sounding good & the songs are varied & as melodic as some of his best.
The production definitely plays it’s part in lifting the album to a standard that an artist like Paul McCartney deserves. It’s atmospheric & earthy in places, ultra poppy in others. There are stand out cuts of course, but it certainly works as a whole piece without the need for skipping… well almost.. The Marmite track on Egypt Station is “Fuh You”. It sticks out a bit to & disturbs the flow a little.  This is probably down to the change in producer for that one track. Ryan Tedder (previously worked with Backstreet Boys, Ed Sheeran, One Direction) produced “Fuh You” & also had a hand in writing it. The sped up vocal responses in the choruses for instance may not have been added if it was produced by the albums main producer Greg Kurstin (previously worked with Beck, The Shins, Foo Fighters). It maybe shouldn’t have been considered for the album & instead released as a separate EP with the other McCartney/Tedder collaborations from the same sessions. Some people (not me) can’t stand “Ebony & Ivory” yet it closes one of McCartney’s finest solo albums, and like “Tug of War” I reckon in time “Egypt Station” will be regarded as one of Pauls finest solo albums. A triumph.

Take it Away – The Complete Paul McCartney Archive Podcast Review

We’ve been enjoying this podcast series by Ryan Brady & Chris Mercer. Each Episode picks apart a McCartney solo or Wings album, track by track, in chronological order.

For McCartney fans, this podcast promises “no more lonely nights” (yesss!) & car journeys from heaven. Ryan & Chris’ love for McCartney is palpable & they have clearly done their homework in prep for each episode. They have a good handle on the history of each track & comprehensive knowledge regarding the technical side of the recordings.

As well as the history, the recording details & the general Macca chit chat, they play generous snippets of each track they discuss. Which is always nice when people are discussing the details of a song. Whether it’s talking about music, a scene from a film or whatever, it’s helpful to have that instant reference. The show always begins with a nice cheesy, Macca friendly synth version of “Martha My Dear”, which is sure to kick off each episode for you with a smile.

I was surprised at which of the tracks they deemed as mediocre or disliked. You’re always gonna get that on a series like this though. It makes for a good back & fourth between you & the podcast. Throughout the series I would occasionally find myself responding to them in disbelief.. “what?? “That Would be Something?? I LOVE THAT!” or.. “the medley on Red Rose Speedway?? C’mon! Surely?”. I was particularly surprised at their kind of lukewarm summary of McCartney, Maccas 1970 debut solo album, one of my all time favourite albums.

The analysis is deep & well thought through & they have some interesting theories on where some of the lyrics may have come from & what they might mean. Personally I’m not usually too bothered about dissecting lyrics or finding meanings in them etc. Gobbledegook or not I just love the hooks Macca creates by piecing words together. It is interesting how opinions differ between fellow music enthusiasts though, we all look for different things in it of course.

I must say, the fact that they don’t hold back on their opinions adds to what makes this such an interesting listen. Much in the same way you would debate or disagree with your mates on these topics down the pub. Actually, that is what this series is like, like being with your mates, discussing every single Macca solo track in order. Singing the parts you like to each other, laughing, disagreeing. Not a bad idea that.. must text the lads.

In summary Take it Away is bloody great. Every Macca fan will enjoy it. Two thumbs up!

Listen to the series here…..

Christmas / Winter Solstice Acid Folk Mix of UK 60’s & 70’s Artists

We made this compilation in 2018. This Christmas mix has a more pastoral, reflective mood to the usual upbeat Christmas pop tunes. A nice folky mix to listen to by the fire with a drink. A collection of UK folk artists from the late 60’s through 70’s with a slight psychedelic vibe.

  1. Steve Ashley – Fire & Wine (1974)
  2. Tickawinda – Cold & Raw (1979)
  3. Steeleye Span – Gower Wassail (1971)
  4. Incredible String Band – Chinese White (1967)
  5. Tea & Symphony – Winter (1969)
  6. Vashti Bunyan – Rose Hip (1970)
  7. Midwinter – Winter Song (1973)
  8. The Peelers – Ramblin’ Robin (1972)
  9. Faraway Folk – The Yule Log (1975)
  10. Strawbs – Witchwood (1971)
  11. The Sallyangie – Love in Ice Crystals (1968)
  12. Magic Carpet – Alan’s Christmas Card (1972)
  13. Steve Ashley – Candlemass Carol (1974)
  14. Magna Carta – Midwinter (1969)
  15. Dr. Strangely Strange – Frosty Mornings (1969)
  16. Fotheringay – Winter Winds (1970)

Behind The Tymes Volume 3 – A Fuzzdandy Mix of Worldwide Psych & Popsike from 1969 – 75

Our latest instalment of our Behind the Tymes series. We’ve done a UK mix, a US mix & now we’ve compiled Volume 3, a mix of worldwide artists. Always the same theme, songs that are maybe a little behind the times at the time they were released. Artists still favouring the psychedelic sound of 1967-68 in the post-psych era of 1969 to the mid 70’s.

1) Pholhas – Dead Faces (Brazil 1973)
2) Pan & Regaliz – Waiting in the Monsters Garden (Spain 1971)
3) Jason’s Fleece – Rusty (Sweden 1970)
4) Air – So Many People (Aus 1974)
5) Petards – Cowboy (Germany 1971)
6) Triangle – Le Matin du Premier Ju (France 1972)
7) The Flying Circus – 3667 (Aus 1970)
8) Resan – Solens Van (Sweden 1973)
9) Pirana – Here it Comes Again (Aus 1972)
10) Madden & harris – Fools Paradise, Pt 2 (Aus 1975)
11) Huinca – Gritar (Argentina 1972)
12) Sam Imaginario – Poison (Brazil 1970)
13) Jason’s Fleece – Damn Long Way Between Us (Sweden 1970)
14) Serenity – Sea Time Rain (NZ 1972)
15) The Masters Apprentice – Thyme to Rhyme (Aus 1972)
16) Equipe 84 – Meglio (Italy 1973)
17) Modulos – Otra Vez (Spain 1972)

The Zombies – Telescope (Unreleased 1970 Album.. Not the Usual R.I.P Album)

We’ve put together an album that could have been the Zombies follow up to Odessey & Oracle. There is a lost album which does the rounds, usually goes by the title “R.I.P”. This is different, we’ve used different tracks & mixed the album to work better as a piece. It works pretty well & better than R.I.P in our opinion.

 

The Beatles Sgt Pepper Sessions in Pictures. Check our Pinterest Board

I like everything about sgt pepper era Beatles. Apart from the music, it’s the way they changed. The shorter hair, the sergeant major style clipped moustaches, their outfits & even just the way they looked..they all looked slimmer & wiser somehow. In 1966 The Beatles were donning their out grown mop tops & smart suits. They were cleanly shaven but looking jaded & they left the world with a cliff hanger Tomorrow Never Knows. This track was the highly experimental, possibly eternally timeless final track on their 1966 album Revolver. The Beatles then went eerily quiet for 6 months, unusually so for them, sparking rumours of a break up & prompting sections of the media to report that the band had lost their creative edge & it was all coming to a spluttering, disappointing end.  You can imagine how eager the band must have been, sitting in Abbey Road’s studio 2, anxious to reveal their next single to prove everybody wrong. Then they jump out of their supposed slumber with a big “SSSURPRISE!” and they release the most advanced pop record in history, Strawberry Fields Forever, re-emerging from the shadows, looking like a gay section from the American civil war.

I love to imagine what I would’ve been feeling had I been alive at the time, impatiently waiting to hear what my favourite band were going to do next & then being slapped around the face with Strawberry Fields, a knockout blow! For anyone who wasn’t around at the time of it’s release it’s easy to just accept that song as just, a great song. But I’m guessing in 1967 it was like hearing. ..well basically like hearing nothing you’d ever heard before, or even thought possible of hearing in the future. A huge step forward, a progression, fast forwarding everybody else in popular culture towards new horizons & opportunities. And this was just the first taster of what the band had been up to all those months. The album, Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band was coming next & this was to contain more of the same. Big, new sounds, new song structures & concepts. It’s just a really interesting, intriguing period in The Beatles history, which was the turning point to a completely new approach for the band & every other band around at that time.

We’ve been collecting images of the Pepper sessions for a while & have cross referenced what we found with the “Complete Recording Sessions” book & the “Recording The Beatles” book for dates. We checked on what days they wore what clothes so we know what session they were currently involved in on each picture we found. Check out the collection so far on our Pinterest board.

Our Sgt Pepper Sessions Pinterest Board HERE..